Internet blackout post-mortem: Who still supports SOPA/PIPA? Who went dark? Did it help?

 

In the last day my search engine traffic has been divided into three categories: 1) Why is [Wikipedia/Google/some other site] blacked out? 2) Which sites are blacked out today? 3) Which politicians support SOPA?

The first one, admittedly, I was trolling for, and I got it. The second one, I had a partial list, but I’m not sure anyone had a truly complete list since more and more sites were going dark all day. SOPA Strike, created by AmericanCensorship.org, has probably the most complete list of sites that participated in some kind of protest, whether they went completely dark like Reddit did or did something more symbolic like Google.  So far, they are claiming that a total of 75,000 sites participated.

The third one is still in flux. As of 10 pm ET, 18 senators have come out as opposing PIPA, many of whom were originally sponsors of the bill. This has been taken as a sign that today’s protest has been a resounding success. However, this doesn’t mean that we’ve “won.” SOPA is in markup again, and will likely make its return to the House next month. PIPA still hasn’t been withdrawn. Keep an eye open and an ear to the ground, and be ready to write or call your congresscritters again if you need to. For a full, regularly updated list of senators’ positions on PIPA, opencongress.org’s whip count is a good resource. Propublica also has a nice tool that visually shows the positions of legislators in both houses of Congress, and allows you to filter by various parameters.

 

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